Comments

  1. “what they’re up to on that page (like reading, writing or idle).”
    – Do the users know that this kind of tracking is happening? this sounds invasive to me.

    September 20, 2009 at 11:48 am |
  2. nicholas:

    so how do you stop it?

    June 24, 2010 at 11:00 am |
  3. Chartbeat.js:

    Non-invasive My Arse.

    Edit: A link to the actual source code, instead of a paste.

    July 16, 2010 at 12:58 pm |
  4. Rick:

    I’m amazed how naive and trusting the average person is. I don’t think I need to rehash all the lies we’ve been fed from government and big corporations. I’ve seen (with my own eyes) the lies increase in volume dramatically in the last ten years while the plausibility and sophistication has decreased. It wouldn’t surprise me to read “My dog ate my homework.” from a Congressman.

    Does anybody believe Google when they claim they “accidentally” procured information from home wireless networks? The question we should be discussing is what haven’t we found out about. Very disturbing trends in the U.S.

    August 5, 2010 at 4:36 am |
  5. hosts:

    The easiest way to block it is to add a line to your hosts file to route ping.chartbeat.net to your local machine.

    The hosts file is located in /etc/hosts on OSX and *NIX, and in c:\windows\system32\drivers\hosts on Windows systems.

    Simply add the line

    127.0.0.1 ping.chartbeat.net

    And now whenever any program on your computer tries to access ping.chartbeat.net, it will simply be redirected to your local machine, resulting in a “page not found” error.

    August 13, 2010 at 5:01 pm |
  6. This all sounds wonderful except:

    I didn’t ask ping.chartbeat.net to notify me when my site is up or down.

    I didn’t add it to my site.

    I chose to add Google analytics to my site.

    The comparison to a competitor’s service is irrelevant. It’s like saying “well the big kids do it, what’s the problem?”

    So to say it’s intrusive and unwanted and offers me no value is as kind as I can put it. Now if I can just find a way to remove what I never asked be added by a company I’ve never heard of…won’t that be grand?

    August 17, 2010 at 2:38 pm |
  7. Rod:

    It isn’t silent and it does slow down your browsing experience. If you happen to like reading the content of the website and don’t welcome distractions in the form of things that keep moving on the browser screen, that ‘Transferring data to ping.chartbeat.net” message that constantly flickers at the bottom of the screen totally destroys the experience of quietly reading a piece of news or whatever. So yes it is intrusive, invasive, unwelcome etc. I’ve killed it.

    September 22, 2010 at 7:21 pm |
  8. What exactly calls ping.chartbeat.net though? I often see it in blogs that don’t have any plugins related specifically to that site. What others call chartbeat? Google Analytics? Clicky Stats? WordPress? Something else?

    January 6, 2011 at 3:28 pm |
  9. Chris:

    ABP does not stop it, and it does slow things down. The only reason I noticed it was because my browser was hung up for several seconds while trying to go from one site to another. Im about sick of techno-sheeple saying that whatever my PC is doing is fine, and I should just let Windows do whatever it wants , etc…

    July 18, 2011 at 8:46 pm |
  10. Buzz:

    STOP DRINKING THE KOOLAID, RYAN. You’re shilling and enabling these f*cks. Just going to one webpage with ping.chartbeat.net’s cancerous tumor caused my laptop’s fans to go into overdrive, heating up my palm rest like crazy; that’s how much processing power it was forcing my cpu to do. I created a blocking rule in Little Snitch and the mother f’er’s stopped cold, and so did my fan. Non-invasive, my ass.

    Yeah so you can block them somehow. Does this mean if you lock your front door, but have a large foundation vent, it’s not the burglar’s fault, but yours, when you get broken into? Aholes like chartbeat are slimy jerks. Forcing people to jump through hoops when they shouldn’t have to. Victimizing those casual net users less tech-savvy than the readers here. Stop being so Pollyanna about it and defending them.What does it take to get you to see the light?

    August 24, 2011 at 2:26 am |
  11. Tim:

    Chartbeat.net does slow your browser down. It and all the other analytic tools on the net. Your browser doesn’t load the page until it has contact. Check out how many times U see “waiting for chartbeat.net” when you’re waiting for the page to load. /T

    September 7, 2011 at 6:36 am |
  12. anon:

    Hah. Yeah right, not invasive. Don’t worry, it only tracks what you’re reading and when you’re reading it. No biggie! Sheesh the things people put up with. By the way, there exist services that ping your site from many places around the world to check if your site is up and running *and do this without involving any site users*. host-tracker.com is one. There are others.

    September 23, 2011 at 1:14 am |
  13. I’m experiencing some weirdness on kickstarter.com, can’t update my profile. I notice that my browser is trying to load something from ping.chartbeat.net. Then I switch to safari, site flips out and reloads every few seconds. I see this in the ‘activity’ showing an error trying to load something from chartbeat:
    http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6225/6270701593_42ed503957_o.png

    This can’t be a good thing. Anyway Ryan- thanks for addressing this publicly.

    October 22, 2011 at 9:13 pm |
  14. Mark:

    Is there a way to track how much your web site is being used without resorting to tools that create an unreasonable intrusion on the privacy of your users?

    I’m pretty sure that would entail running it on your own server, because pretty much any 3rd party web site accesses can be used for tracking across multiple web sites, that is, virtual 3rd party cookies.

    October 24, 2011 at 1:42 pm |

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.